Categories
Organizations Profiles

Tammy Tibbetts Changes the World With Cupcakes and Content

Tammy Tibbetts
IMG: via shesthefirst.org

When Tammy Tibbetts was 23, she worked as a web content manager for a women’s magazine.  She loved seeing first hand how social media can create change in how we accomplish things and connect with others.  When she became frustrated by an article on teen pregnancy in Liberia, she realized she wanted to help promote education for girls in developing countries.  Education is the primary factor in decreasing rates of teen pregnancy, unemployment, and domestic violence.  Tibbitts founded She’s the First with a group of friends in 2009, with a simple social media campaign calling young people into action to raise enough money to sponsor just one girl to finish school.

In 2011, Tibbetts was able to relaunch She’s The First into a fully-fledged nonprofit.  The organization’s fundraising projects have included several fun activities. These include promoting bake sales of tie-dyed cupcakes (300 cupcakes at one dollar a piece raises enough to sponsor one girl), to a benefit concert called Girls Who Rock.  The organization researches the highest quality education partners, and provides them with profiles on girls that the organization’s donors are supporting.  The site is now an interactive community connecting donors to organizations and subsequently girls in developing countries that are now able to go to high school by participating in one of various programs.

For Tammy Tibbetts entire profile, click here.

Categories
Organizations Resources

Carry 5 Walk for Water Raises $90,000 at Seattle Center

Carry 5 Walk For Water
IMG: vai water1st.org

On May 5th, over 500 people gathered at the Seattle Center to carry containers full of water to walk 5 kilometers in solidarity with those who have to make similar journeys every day.  Water 1st International of Seattle organized the event to raise money to support clean water and hygiene products in the world’s poorest communities in six different developing countries.  The walk began at the International Fountain and made two laps around the Seattle Center, bringing attention and camaraderie to the fight for social justice.

While Water 1st is continuing fundraising through May 31st, the walk has raised over $90,000 dollars, which is enough to provide 1,200 children with clean water in their homes for a lifetime.  Currently, over 200 million people, mostly women and young girls, have to spend 5 hours a day walking several miles to collect water for drinking, cooking and washing.  The full containers of water weigh about forty pounds.  About 5,000 deaths each day are attributed to causes that could be prevented by having access to sanitation and clean water.  Water 1st International is dedicated to preventing these deaths and lessoning the burden on young girls to collect water so that they have time to attend school and live a full life.

One Seattle teen fundraiser stood out above the crowd. Fourteen year old Giuliana Sercu has raised nearly $10,000 for the Carry 5 event after being inspired by a trip to Ethiopia in 2011.  She says her passion from the cause comes from seeing the problems first hand, and knowing that an amount as little as $75 can change a child’s life.  Another young person, a 6th grader named Elli, raised $7,500 dollars.  Her inspiration was from watching a video Water 1st showed at her school in 2nd grade.  Mobilizing youth to change the world is making a big impact in the communities that need the most help.  Both young ladies said the best way to raise money is send emails, letters and talk to as many people as possible.

Anyone can still donate to the Carry 5 event through Water 1st International’s page.  A donation of $75 dollars can give a child a lifetime of access to clean water.

To view Water 1st International’s entire profile, click here.

Categories
Organizations Profiles Resources

Malala Fund Receives First Donation

Malala Yousafzai
IMG: via The Malala Fund

Malala Yousafzai is fifteen years old. Last year, the Taliban, who sought to silence her from speaking up for Pakistani women’s education rights, shot her in the head. They shot to kill, but Malala was stronger than they had reckoned—and she survived.

“Here’s what they accomplished,” said Angelina Jolie, who spoke at the recent Women in the World Summit in New York City. “They shot her point-blank range in the head—and made her stronger. The brutal attempt to silence her voice made it stronger.”

Malala, who was moved to England for recovery after she was shot, now attends school in Birmingham. But she hasn’t forgotten what it was like when she was in Pakistan. She formed Malala fund, an educational charity designed to help more women and girls become empowered and educated in Pakistan and around the world.

On Thursday, April 4th, Malala announced the first donation to the fund—$45,000. “Today I am going to announce the happiest moment of my life, and that is the first grant of Malala Fund,” Malala said in a recorded video announcement that played at the Women in the World Summit. “I invite all of you to support Malala Fund and let us turn the education of 40 girls into 40 million girls.”

The video was presented by Angelina Jolie, who pledged to give an additional $200,000 to the charity. The first grant will be given to a group in Malala’s homeland, the Swat Valley in Pakistan. It will help to educate forty girls between the ages of five and twelve who would otherwise be forced into domestic labor. By giving the girls a safe place to study as well as providing financial support to their families, Malala Fund paves the way for women’s education and empowerment in Pakistan. .

Categories
Organizations Profiles Resources

Henry Kravis Leadership Prize Goes to Olympian Johann Olav Koss

Henry R Kravis Prize in Leadership
IMG: via Business Wire

Four-time Olympic gold medalist Johann Olav Koss is considered one of the best speed skaters the world has ever seen. But he’s done more than win Olympic gold medals for his athletic skills: he’s also the founder of Right To Play, an international nonprofit organization that uses the power of play to help children overcome adversity. And now Koss has one more reason to keep changing children’s lives—he’s been awarded the lucrative Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership for 2013.

The $250,000 prize is in its eighth year and seeks to recognize extraordinary leadership in the nonprofit sector. The prize will formally be awarded to Koss on April 18th, and the money will go toward supporting programs and events put on by Right To Play.

Henry Kravis, private equity mogul and founder of the prize, says that Right To Play and all other recipients of the prize “have a real and measurable impact in the community. Johann Olav Koss is not only a champion in his native country and a true hero for aspiring athletes, his legacy also now includes transforming the lives of hundreds of thousands of children through something as simple as the opportunity to play sports.”

In its twelve years of live, Right To Play has reached over one million children in 20 countries, helping to teach them skills that will allow them to overcome current adversity and create a better future for themselves. Right To Play also helps promote social change within communities, working with girls, boys, people with disabilities, those affected by HIV/AIDS, former combatants and refugees.

“Play can help children overcome adversity and understand there are people who believe in them,” Koss said. “We would like every child to understand and accept their own abilities, and to have hopes and dreams. But also, to have respect for the person on the other side of the field or who has been on the other side of conflict.”

For more information, check out our full profile of the Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership.