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Glorieta Camps Welcomes Migrant Children

Glorieta Camps is a private Christian faith-based summer camp, with over 100 buildings on 2,400 acres in New Mexico. Ordinarily, it boasts over 2,000 beds, and rents itself out to various groups for church, school, or corporate retreats. But it is currently ramping up to house as many as 2,400 unaccompanied migrant children on behalf of the White House and U.S. Health and Human Services Department.

The last few years have seen a surge in children and families arriving to cross the U.S.-Mexican border, most refugees seeking asylum. The influx of unaccompanied minors has overwhelmed the resources in place to handle them, resulting in unsuitable facilities, like a San Diego convention center, being converted to house them. Due to mismanagement, many have also been housed like criminals. For instance, in late March, journalists were allowed to tour a Texas detention facility for migrant children. More than 4,000 people were crowded into a tent structure meant for 250 and surrounded by barbed wire.

Seeking safer and more suitable housing sites, the White House asked Glorieta Camps to volunteer their facility. It did. Scrambling to get volunteers and donations in place, the Camps were ready to receive children by Thursday, April 1. But this is merely a stopgap. Locked into its own schedule, Glorieta Camps is only willing to house these children for two months before it will return to its usual business–at which point the children will need a new place to stay.

According to a spokesman for New Mexico Senator Martin Heinrich, the Health and Human Services Department doesn’t have plans to open any new shelters in New Mexico at this time, but it seems like a very necessary action. We have not yet left the days of our border policies putting children in cages, and that can’t be ignored or swept under the rug.

Image: Shutterstock

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Out of the Limelight: The Jobs’ Generous Giving

Steve and Laurene Powell Jobs
IMG: via Forbes

The world loved Steve Jobs. The innovative, intelligent college-dropout who founded Apple and Pixar was charismatic and easy to like. He inspired people with his products and vision, and devastated many with his death.

But not everyone had all nice things to say about the Apple CEO. He eventually reached a net worth of $10.2 billion before his death in October 2011, and many criticized the business magnate for not being generous with his fortune. He was worth so much money, yet he hadn’t mentioned any charitable giving to his biographer nor had he gone public about large donation like Bill Gates did. People felt that someone who had such a large fortune ought to be giving more of it away.

But what they didn’t know is that he was giving some of it away. He and his wife, Laurene Powell Jobs, had quietly been giving to charitable causes for over two decades—they just didn’t feel a need to go public about it.

“We’re really careful about amplifying the great work of others in every way that we can, and we don’t like attaching our names to things,” Powell Jobs said in an interview with the New York Times. In other words, they are a private family that doesn’t feel the need to blast their famous name at every good deed.

It’s only recently that Laurene Powell Jobs has decided to step a little more into the limelight. She’s pushing for changes in education, conservation, nutrition, immigration, and even gun control. About a decade ago, Powell Jobs formed a group called Emerson Collective, which is an organization that awards grants and investments in education and other initiatives.

Emerson Collective is an LLC, rather than a certified non-profit, which means it can donate to for-profit, non-profit, and even political causes alike. And unlike a foundation, it doesn’t have to publicly report what it gives. That allows for an incredible amount of freedom and privacy, which is right up the Jobs family’s alley.

Powell-Jobs also helped form an initiative called College Track in 1997, which provides college prep for aspiring college students. Through College Track, she has served as a mentor to young people, helping them achieve their goals.

“It’s not about getting any public recognition for her giving, it’s to help touch and transform individual live,” said one of Powell Jobs’ close friends, philanthropist Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen.